Friday, August 11, 2017

The Privacy Advisor Podcast: Kirk Nahra on the complications of healthcare privacy

I listen to podcasts. I have recently come across "The Privacy Advisor Podcast". From the perspective of Privacy, this podcast does a fantastic job. Further Angelique  is fun to listen to. I suspect each podcast we learn a bit more about her, very unusual for a Privacy Advisor. But then again Privacy Principles do enable the subject to expose their data as they wish, a form of control.

To my blog audience, that tends to focus on Healthcare Privacy, the podcast with Kirk Nahra is fantastic. Kirk has a deep and thorough grasp of "Healthcare Privacy" in the USA, from a reality perspective. Not from a ideology perspective. Thus for those that want to understand WHY is Healthcare Privacy like it is, in the USA, this podcast hits every topic. I will warn that none of the points are fully explained, but all the points are spoken. So if you listen to this, and don't understand a point Kirk is making, then you need to do some research. I fully agree with Kirk's point of view and assessment of why and how we got here. He speaks of many of the struggles that I have participated in over the past 25 years. A he points out, if we were to write Privacy regulations today, it would not look this way.

The Privacy Advisor Podcast: Kirk Nahra on the complications of healthcare privacy
6/30/17 by IAPP Publications Team
Web player
Episode
In this episode of The Privacy Advisor Podcast, Kirk Nahra of Wiley Rein talks about the challenges of working in the healthcare space these days, particularly, the challenges healthcare entities have in managing the multitude of third-party vendors and the "ongoing element of risk" involved in trying to ensure not only your organization is in compliance with regulations, but vendors are too. He also discusses the explosion of available data not covered under current healthcare laws, like the data from your wearable devices, and whether that data is regulated by any body of law at all. "We've got this enormous gap right now," and the new administration isn't particularly interested in figuring that out, Nahra says, but he's hopeful U.S. state Attorneys General are going to pick up the slack.Want to keep up with new episodes? Be sure to subscribe to our feed.